Healthcare Assistants (HCA’s)

Healthcare assistants (HCAs) are a vital part of the whole multi-disciplinary nursing team within a hospital or home. Under the supervision and direction of a qualified nurse or senior healthcare assistant, the HCA can provide invaluable nursing and care support for patients and their families.

As the first point of contact for many patients and members of the public, healthcare assistants need to be well-presented and confident with good interpersonal skills. Working in care homes, hospitals, mental health, in the community and the GP surgery, they are at the front line of patient care and at the heart of many organisations.

HCAs also often act as the go-between between members of the multi-disciplinary team, feeding the relevant information back to the rest of the healthcare team. Therefore a good HCA is an excellent communicator, organised and knows what information to pass on and when.

As crucial members of the healthcare team, HCAs work on the same shift or rota systems as other healthcare professionals, and therefore should be recognised as the integral team members that they are.

At Medicat we recognise that our HCAs have particular skills sets and knowledge that makes you stand out from others in your field. That’s why we have varying pay scales depending on the job role being undertaken, the skills required and the working location. We also offer opportunities for personal and professional development, advanced training and also education and learning opportunities (we currently have some HCAs undertaking their NVQ Level 2, whilst others are currently training for their senior HCA status).

Healthcare Assistant Levels

HCA – general healthcare assistant for care/nursing homes and some community hospitals

SHCA – senior healthcare assistant, able to undertake a medicine round, record basic physiological observations and have additional clinical skills. Able to work in care/nursing homes and community hospitals.

Specialist – healthcare assistant with advanced clinical skills and an ability to work in minor injuries, treatment rooms and often in phlebotomy.

Friendly nurse cares for an elderly woman in a nursing home.

As the first point of contact for many patients and members of the public, healthcare assistants need to be well-presented and confident with good interpersonal skills. Working in care homes, hospitals, mental health, in the community and the GP surgery, they are at the front line of patient care and at the heart of many organisations.

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